Next version of xLIB - features?

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magicdanw
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Post by magicdanw »

A recalled command, that lets you repeat any possible function, would be slower than the command originally was. However, a command to recall one particular function, like real(50 that calls real(30,aa,bb,cc,dd,ee,ff, would be muhc faster, if done properly (shouldn't be too hard to do). I'm not suggesting an entire recall command system, just a method for storing a few grayscale parameters so that the one grayscale command called every other line can be parsed as fast as is possible.
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kalan_vod
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Post by kalan_vod »

Magic, that would be cool and all but a programmer could make it loop forever (batteries die)...or another argument could be added for a exit key ;)..
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JoostinOnline
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Post by JoostinOnline »

Hmm...a grayscale virus :)
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magicdanw
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Post by magicdanw »

No, I'm saying that I don't like the idea of an entire function-recalling system. It's overly complicated, it would slow down command execution, and you've pointed out a logic flaw that could lead to problems (though I think that the stack would overflow and a ram clear would occur before batteries died, and a check could be put in to prevent this problem). Instead, all I want is this:

At the beginning of the program, scene, whatever, you call:

Code: Select all

real(40,param1,param2,param3,...
which stores the parameters to saferam. The parameters are only for the grayscale function. No other function can be mapped.

Then, every other line, instead of calling

Code: Select all

real(50,param1,param2,param3,...
which is slow, and takes up space, you call

Code: Select all

real(50
and the function looks up the preparsed parameters from the saferam location. This idea is safe, it saves space, and it speeds up program execution, to improve grayscale quality and possibly make grayscale possible on the 83+ BE.
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tr1p1ea
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Post by tr1p1ea »

Im afraid that storing things in saferam isnt safe at all since people often use more than 1 asm lib and it cannot be garaunteed that the information will not be over-written. I dont think there is a problem with the way grayscale is currently done from BASIC, also i doubt there would be any real benefits to doing it this way.
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magicdanw
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Post by magicdanw »

I'll trust your judgment since you're the author, but I think that parsing three real numbers every other line of execution has to take some toll on speed. As for the issue of getting overwritten, you could tell the person to re-establish the parameters after running asm libraries.
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Post by calc84maniac »

...or store in an appvar?
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JoostinOnline
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Post by JoostinOnline »

I think that was already discussed earlier, but I am too tired to go through the topic to tell you which page it was on.
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Post by magicdanw »

Appvar is not good, because searching for an appvar each time will slow things down and defeat the purpose. I know, because my app CalcUtil used to look up an appvar each time the parser hook fired, and it slowed execution speed to about 1/3 normal. But three or four bytes of ram, maybe at the beginning of the stack (according to Brandon Wilson, it's safe to assume it won't be popped off), should suffice.
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Post by calc84maniac »

But this won't search for the appvar at each parser fire-up, only at the real(50 (or whatever it is).
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magicdanw
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Post by magicdanw »

Yes, but during grayscale you'll call real(50 every other line, so it would still slow things down and offset the benefits of not parsing real numbers each time.
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kalan_vod
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Post by kalan_vod »

I agree with MD, as it is faster to have number or variable present rather than looking it up each time.
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Demon
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Post by Demon »

Another idea if someone hasn't suggested it already is a way to store and recall what is currently on the homescreen.

Also, a home- and graphscreen cursor that returns the key pressed if anything other than the arrowkeys were hit would be nice.
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JoostinOnline
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Post by JoostinOnline »

I like your first idea, but I don't really understand how your second is different than the getkey function...
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Demon
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Post by Demon »

It'll display a mouse on either the homescreen or the graphscreen that you can move around and when you hit any other key other than the arrowkeys to move it, it'll return the key pressed and the cursor location.
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